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“It’s just frustrating”: students speak out against OSAP changes Over 17,000 McMaster students will be affected by the cuts

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Photo by Kyle West

On Jan 17, the provincial government announced plans to change the Ontario Student Assistance Program and cut tuition by 10 per cent.

The OSAP changes include requiring students to take out a loan when receiving an Ontario Student Grant, lowering the threshold to receive financial assistance, and eliminating the six-month interest-free period after graduation.

On Jan. 31, more than 75 student associations across Canada released an open letter demanding the government reverse the changes to OSAP.

Since the announcement, multiple protests have been held across the province, including in Hamilton.

Students at McMaster are also being affected by the changes, with more than 17,000 full-time students having applied for OSAP.

Many students are concerned about the shift in financial assistance towards loans instead of non-repayable grants.

First-year social sciences student Bryce Lawrence does not get money from her parents for tuition and says she would not be able to go to school without receiving grants and loans through OSAP.

This past year, Lawrence qualified to receive a higher proportion of grants compared to loans. Going forward, she will receive more money in loans and less in grants.

“The 10 per cent tuition decrease is nothing compared to the amount that we are not going to be getting anymore and it is going to be harder for a lot of students,” Lawrence said.

During the school year, Lawrence works three days a week, with the money going directly to basic expenses like groceries, gas and her phone bill.

“I worked hard in high school to get here and I need that money to get myself through it so that in the future I can get myself a good career that will help support a family,” Lawrence said.

Looking forward to next year, Lawrence says the money she gets from OSAP probably will not be enough to cover additional costs on top of tuition.

“It’s just frustrating,” She added. “It is going be weird not having the amount of money I need. Literally nothing is free in school. It is so expensive, and once the money goes into my tuition, I will not have enough to pay for my textbooks and stuff.”

Second-year political science student Zack Anderson said the elimination of the six-month interest-free period is especially harmful.

“It is already stressful enough once I do graduate to try and find a stable income, but I always kind of knew that that six-month cushion was going to be there for me and now that rug’s been pulled out from under me,” he said.

Anderson has relied heavily on OSAP. However, even with OSAP, Anderson still struggles to cover school and living costs beyond just tuition.

This year, he was forced to take a reduced course load and work three jobs to pay for tuition and living costs.

Over the summer, Anderson was working 70-hour weeks to save up for school.

“I have had to take out loans off the bank, I have maxed out credit cards before, done all these kinds of things to try to survive and you take it day by day, week by week,” Anderson said.

While there have yet to be any announcements since Jan. 17, the Ford government’s plans are expected to be in place for the 2019-2020 academic year.

 

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Author: Ryan Tse

Ryan Tse is a second year Arts and Science student. In his free time, he enjoys cheering for the Toronto Maple Leafs, drinking coffee, reading articles in The Athletic and listening to all kinds of music. He spends most of his time in HSL and BSB.