Photos by Catherine Goce

In recent years, Hamilton’s downtown core has changed rapidly, with many businesses closing down and new ones popping up, just as fast. While some may welcome these changes, many others point to a loss for the LGBTQA2S+ community, with many popular gay bars closing down as the city evolved.

In the early 2000s, there were five major gay bars people could go to: The Werx, the Rainbow Lounge, The Embassy, M Bar and The Windsor, all of which were located in Hamilton’s downtown core. Since then, all of these bars have shut their doors.

For James Dee, a McMaster alum and Hamilton resident since 2004, bars such as the Embassy were an important aspect of their experience with Hamilton’s queer community as a place where they could go without threat of violence.  

“We maybe have a little bit of drama and be kind of mean to each other….But when the lights came on at the end of the night you know everyone was checking in with each other like ‘text when you get home and so I know you’re safe,’” Dee said.

While Hamilton’s queer scene thrived in 2004, it was not without violence. In that same year, Hamilton Police Services, among other municipal agencies, raided the Warehouse Spa and Bath and arrested two men for indecent acts. That raid was followed by protests from Hamilton’s LGBTQA2S+ community.

“It felt a lot more dangerous to be visibly queer in 2004,” Dee said. “I think it’s easy to kind of romanticize the time when we had brick and mortar spaces but it’s also easy to forget why we needed those spaces so much.”

Dee believes that, to some degree, places closed down due to a decline in need, but also points to the gentrification of Hamilton as another key reason these spaces disappeared.

“It’s not just the story of queer Hamilton, it’s the story of Hamilton in general…  a lot of the places I used to enjoy hanging out [at] are now bougie coffee shops,” Dee said.

For example, following the shuttering of the Werx’s door, the building was converted into the Spice Factory, a popular wedding venue.

“All across the board, [the gay bars] catered to people with less money,” Dee said. “They don’t survive downtown anymore.”

For Sophie Geffros, another long-time Hamilton resident and McMaster graduate student, the loss of brick-and-mortar spaces has meant a segregation within the community.

Geffros, who spent their teen years in Hamilton, had many of their formative experiences at bars such as the Embassy, where they met older members of the LGBTA2S+ community in addition to those their own age.

“There is still an isolation that I think that can only be combated by in-person interaction,” Geffros said.

“We’re a little more fragmented. Like if I’m going out… I’m going to be going out with people I already know who are members of the community,” they added.

For Geffros, the loss of Hamilton’s queer spaces is especially harmful, as these spaces were often the most accessible hangouts for queer people living in rural communities that lack direct bus service to Toronto.

“Those are people who are particularly isolated, who are often closeted throughout the week and would come to Hamilton on the weekend to blow off steam and be amongst themselves. That’s a real loss,” Geffros said.

While there are no longer any physical LGBTQA2S+ spaces, there are opportunities for Hamilton’s queer community to converge. Dee is one of the founders of Queer Outta Hamilton, a collective that runs monthly queer pub nights, typically at Gallagher’s Pub.

In addition, there are other organizations that offer workshops and events, such as Speqtrum Hamilton, the NGen Youth Centre, Pride Hamilton, the McMaster Students Union Pride Centre and others.

There are also many LGBTQA2S+-friendly bars and clubs, such as Sous Bas, which offers queer events, typically in partnership with Queer Outta Hamilton.

While Hamilton may have lost its major physical queer spaces, the community continues to support each other the best they can.

 

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